What is the world sculpture of San Simeon Shift on bluff?

As the sun sets on October 1, 2021, on the San Simeon shore, it highlights “Shift,” a 1,200-pound monument installed by a team of designers and creators who want to get people thinking about what it is. 'they can do to help bring the earth and its people back into harmony and alignment.

As the sun sets on October 1, 2021, on the San Simeon shore, it highlights “Shift,” a 1,200-pound monument installed by a team of designers and creators who want to get people thinking about what it is. ‘they can do to help bring the earth and its people back into harmony and alignment.

A large, wide-angled steel monument rises nearly three stories above a cliff in San Simeon.

The 1,200-pound sculpture, titled “Shift,” was installed at the waterfront site between Highway 1 and the Pacific Ocean near Pico Drive on October 1.

Unlike other landmarks that have suddenly appeared in San Luis Obispo County and around the world, however, “Shift” has a clear message – and a website, GlobalShift.info.

The seven-person team of designers and builders behind the sculpture want people viewing the art installation to recognize that the world is turning into disruptions brought about by inequality, politics and other factors.

It was “frustration on many levels” that sparked the creation of “Shift,” according to Warren Hamrick, Shell Beach resident, creator, architect and designer of the sculpture.

“We were sitting in my office talking about the state of the world,” he said over the phone, “and how it seems to have changed, especially over the past 10 to 15 years… economically, politically, environmentally… on a lot of things at different levels.

10-01-21 offset with rob.jpg
Atascadero metallurgist Rob Foster shines the tilted stand to get a divided image of the earth on a sculpture installed on October 1, 2021, near the San Simeon shore. The people who created the nearly three-story monument, titled “Shift,” want to highlight the many divisions in the world and make people think about what they can do to help restore harmony to the world. and its inhabitants. Courtesy of Colleen Rosenthal Photography

As he and his friends chatted that day, Hamrick scribbled, “sketching out some ideas,” he explained.

Its design went through “several iterations” before being finalized, “he said. “Then it sat on my desk for literally months, if not years. “

When his friend, Shell Beach builder Charlie Main, spotted the design recently, he told Hamrick, “Let’s build it! “

This is what they did, drawing on the enthusiasm and skills of metallurgist and welder Rob Foster of Atascadero and builder Neal Portlock of Cambria, as well as the energy brought to the project by the woman. of Hamrick, Kathy Hamrick, Main’s wife, Terri Main, and Darcy Cleome. from Cambria.

01/10/21 change of landscape.jpg
As the sun sets on October 1, 2021, on a San Simeon shore, it highlights “Shift,” a dizzying 1,200-pound monument installed by a team of designers and creators who want to make people think about it. what they can do to help restore harmony between the land and its people. Photo courtesy of Colleen Rosenthal Photography

However, the team first had to find a place to place their monument, which features two halves of the earth moving along the axis of the globe.

This issue was resolved when they struck a deal with landowner Michael Hanchett to Cavalier Oceanfront Resort in San Simeon.

In less than three weeks by September, the team had gathered their materials and assembled the monument. After a mostly hazy summer on the shore, the sky cleared on installation day.

It is not yet known how long the monument will remain in its temporary location.

10/01/21 sunset offset full image.jpg
As the sun sets on October 1, 2021, on a San Simeon shore, a couple snuggle up on a bench near “Shift,” a new 1,200-pound sculpture. Photo courtesy of Colleen Rosenthal Photography

Members of the GlobalShift team hope each viewer stops and thinks about what the sculpture means to them.

In a statement on the website, the GlobalShift team asks if the image represents the reality of “the state of the world today?” Is this a representation of where we are heading? What could we do, or how would we change to bring the two halves together? “

“It doesn’t all have to be so negative,” Hanchett wrote via email. “This is just a wake-up call. “

“We just want to trigger things in people’s minds, bring attention to change and make a positive change in things,” Hamrick concluded, “to see what we can do as individuals to put it back. things in alignment. “

Related Stories from San Luis Obispo Tribune

Kathe Tanner has written about the people and places of SLO County’s North Coast since 1981, first as a columnist and then also as a journalist. Her career has included stints as a bakery owner, public relations manager, radio host, trail guide, and jewelry designer. She has lived in Cambria for over four decades, and if it happens in town, Kathe knows it.


Source link

Comments are closed.