Metalworker – For Jaibi http://forjaibi.com/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 02:46:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://forjaibi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/forjaibi-icon-150x150.jpg Metalworker – For Jaibi http://forjaibi.com/ 32 32 What the labor movement lost with the deaths of Richard Trumka and Stanley Aronowitz https://forjaibi.com/what-the-labor-movement-lost-with-the-deaths-of-richard-trumka-and-stanley-aronowitz/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 20:50:00 +0000 https://forjaibi.com/what-the-labor-movement-lost-with-the-deaths-of-richard-trumka-and-stanley-aronowitz/ In August 5, 2021 union activists across the country have lost a champion with the death of AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka. Eleven days later another working class activist, militant sociologist Stanley Aronowitz, died of a long illness. Between the arc of their overlapping but very different careers lay both the promise and the tragic failure […]]]>

In August 5, 2021 union activists across the country have lost a champion with the death of AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka. Eleven days later another working class activist, militant sociologist Stanley Aronowitz, died of a long illness. Between the arc of their overlapping but very different careers lay both the promise and the tragic failure of the ideal of worker-centered democracy, an ideal to which everyone was deeply attached.

Trumka’s feat seemed to mark the spectrum of possibilities at the head of a divided and deeply wounded workers’ movement. Born to Polish-Italian parents in the mining country of Pennsylvania in 1949, Trumka followed his father to mining before going to college and law school and working as a staff attorney for the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) at their headquarters in Washington, DC. . nineteen eighty one then president of the union in 1982, Trumka has adapted contemporary streams of rights awareness and community organizing to traditions of grassroots activism within a UMWA structure reeling from industrial decline, technological displacement and union corruption. Pittston’s prolonged strike in 1989 in which the union repelled the use of replacement workers not only restored the fighting spirit of the union, but by linking union activism with the non-violent civil disobedience of the civil rights struggles of African Americans and anti- apartheid, Trumka suggested that Big Labor could yet return to its roots social movement.

Radical hopes were largely invested in the election of Trumka as AFL-CIO secretary-treasurer over John Sweeney’s insurgent New voice »slate in 1995. At that point, years of slippery membership and reckless obedience to a Democratic Party that would pass neither labor law reform nor a brutal job loss from NAFTA, ultimately tipped the scales. against the regime in place of Lane Kirkland and his preferred replacement, the secretary-treasurer of the federation Tom Donahue.

In the first open presidential campaign in the history of the AFL-CIO, the New Voice list won on the basis not so much of presidential support from national unions as of popular mobilization within national and local union federations. . On a wave of enthusiasm, executives at New Voice – hoping to replicate Sweeney’s success in lobbying management for Service Employee Contracts (SEIU), the largest and most dynamic union in the countries – have pushed other federation affiliates to increase recruitment budgets, recruit women and minorities for leadership positions and open their ranks to a sprawling new immigrant workforce.

Pushing back against an increasingly conservative Republican-led Congress, the AFL-CIO has invested resources in local and state as well as federal election campaigns; his highest ever CAP contributions were recorded from 1996 To 2008 .

Despite reduced resources, he could still claim credit for tipping key states like Pennsylvania and Ohio to Obama in 2008.

As President of the AFL-CIO upon Sweeney’s retirement in 2009, Trumka aimed to expand the New Voice agenda by vigorously reaching out to the unorganized. His spirit is perhaps best represented in the Jobs with Justice movement, a coalition of local unions and community groups that he co-founded at the end of the day. 1980s in an attempt to organize low-wage workers both inside and outside the traditional halls of collective bargaining. As he told delegates at the AFL-CIO convention in Los Angeles in 2013, the organization had to do some things differently.

In practice, however, Trumka struggled to advance the labor reformers’ agenda. While dealing with the fallout from the country’s financial crisis and the continued haemorrhaging of manufacturing jobs, the federation faced its own economic crisis, due to the defection – a few years before Trumka joined – of powerful affiliates like SEIU and the AFL -DSI Teamsters. Forced to balance the needs of progressive affiliates like the food service workers of UNITE HERE and the American Federation of Teachers with more conservative strongholds in the building trades, Trumka’s own progressive instincts were at times clouded by considerations of realpolitik. Specifically, after the murders of Michael Brown and George Floyd, Trumka struggled to balance condemnations of racism with the defense of some affiliate agreements. 100,000 police officers with the AFL-CIO. Meanwhile, for the federation as a whole, falling membership numbers have necessitated tight budgets and a reduction in new organizing initiatives. A split in its own ranks, a function of both racial and geographic divisions, has largely pushed the AFL-DSI at the forefront of burgeoning post-Trump anti-Trump resistance2016.

Trumka, a supporter of Biden in 2020, has pushed hard for the vital reform of the labor law protecting the right to organize, or PRO Act. As of this writing, however, the best that can be hoped for is that some, as yet unspecified, aspects of the PRO law can be incorporated into the Democrats’ Reconciliation Omnibus Bill.

Is there a manual by which the AFL-CIO, as currently configured, can reorient American capitalism to improve worker power? Even among longtime friends from work, many are skeptical. The baton, in any case, passes to the close ally of Trumka, former secretary-treasurer and now new president Liz Shuler.

If Trumka represented the best impulses of the really existing labor movement, Stanley Aronowitz dreamed of a more ambitious movement. A Bronx-born metallurgist, labor organizer (for the New Jersey Petroleum, Chemical and Atom Workers Union) and civil rights activist, Stanley at age 35 received a bachelor’s degree from the New School for Social Research in 1968, obtained a doctorate in sociology at the Union Graduate School of 1975, then taught, wrote, and waved from his perch at New York University’s City Graduate Center. Always exuberant in person and in prose, he embodied the effective scope and limits of the New Left sensibility that resonated even as it moved through. 25 books (as author or publisher) on labor and labor, social class, education and technology. His influence was manifested in many left-wing initiatives, notably Left studies, the Conference of Socialist Scientists and Social text, of which he was founding editor-in-chief of 1979, and even a candidacy for governor of New York on the Green Party ticket in 2002 .

Throughout Aronowitz’s multifaceted work, no theme has probably been followed more consistently than his critical, and often acerbic, commentary on the labor movement in which he cut his teeth. The gist of Aronowitz’s critique – and a position from which he never deviated from – was contained in his first and most influential work, False promises: the formation of the conscience of the American working class (1973). Drawing on Aronowitz’s own professional experience, his readings of Marxism and cultural theory, and his interest in popular culture, a generational rebellion against capitalist regimentation erupted from its pages. The book attracted praise from Noam Chomsky and Herbert Marcuse. Organized work – the bearer of a false promise “of freedom and opportunity for the working class – took it on the chin. The unions, ”he said, have all but given up on the fight for decent working conditions and, to the extent that they are seen as staunch defenders of the status quo… are increasingly seen as enemies. Aronowitz even condemned the Wagner Act, this symbol of the role of unions in the New Deal Order, to appease a class struggle against alienated labor itself that might otherwise take off within a growing new working class. young and multiracial.

Yet Aronowitz would soon temper his assessment of what was possible. In Heroes of the working class: a new strategy for work (1983), a self-proclaimed sequel to False promises, he admitted that his exuberance had led him to exaggerate the transformational potential of the 60s social movements and flout both the past achievements of unions and the continued need for progressives to look to unions for leadership. However, this review was linked to its continued focus on post-materialist issues associated with feminism, black liberation, and worker self-management. It was only by freeing itself from the grip of business unionism and narrow contractualism that a new working class made up of women, minorities and the technical intelligentsia ”to stem the omen of economic decline. Through 1998, when Aronowitz published From the Ashes of the Old: American Work and America’s Future, the ranks of organized workers in the private sector rose from 35 % in the 1940s less than ten percent. However, while his tone was more intense, his message remained largely the same: only one militant minority within unions and the wider labor movement ”could push unions to be more combative to challenge capital and the repressive state ” more overexploitation of working poor. “

For him, this meant less dependence on the Democratic Party and a concentration of the fighting on the South, the poor workers, professional and technical employees and low-paid white-collar workers.

Sixteen years later, in his last big word on the subject—Death and the Life of American Work: Towards a New Labor Movement (2014) – Aronowitz combined a now familiar critique of traditional unions (c. 15, and short-lived protest strikes. While not mentioned by Aronowitz, those positive strands had also all been championed by AFL-CIO President Trumka, always on the lookout for new strategies.

What did it mean, then, that when one of the trade union movement’s most talkative internal critics and its CEO finally found political common ground, it turned out to be of a largely arid plain? Together, unions and their community allies were most successful in forming a social movement when they both engaged with intellectuals who linked their struggles through broader arcs of meaning. As good boredom ”, we need this useful internal friction ”again. We have lost two dedicated and honorable souls who did their best for the dignity of American workers. Alas, the cause has miles to go.


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Steve C. Raatikka, 56, Sartell https://forjaibi.com/steve-c-raatikka-56-sartell/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 18:14:41 +0000 https://forjaibi.com/steve-c-raatikka-56-sartell/ May 25, 1965 – September 17, 2021 Steven C. Raatikka passed away after a heroic 2-year battle with pancreatic cancer on September 17, 2021, at the age of 56. Steve was born on May 25, 1965 to Reuben and Linda (Hendrickson) Raatikka in Wadena, Minnesota. He describes himself as a “farm boy”. He graduated from […]]]>

May 25, 1965 – September 17, 2021

Steven C. Raatikka passed away after a heroic 2-year battle with pancreatic cancer on September 17, 2021, at the age of 56.

Steve was born on May 25, 1965 to Reuben and Linda (Hendrickson) Raatikka in Wadena, Minnesota. He describes himself as a “farm boy”. He graduated from Sebeka High School in 1983 where he enjoyed playing football and baseball. He found his vocation as a sheet metal worker and for 13 years he “carried the tools”. Steve was a proud member of Sheet Metal Workers Local # 10 and was elected Trade Representative for Central Minnesota in 2000. He has served on many boards over the years and has worked selflessly to empower every worker. a voice in the workplace. One of his passions during his career was the training and education of apprentices. Upon his early retirement at age 55, he was honored when the Training Center located in St. Cloud was named the Steve Raatikka Training Center.

Lovingly known as Grumpy by his grandchildren, the love and pride he had for his family was unmatched. He loved to “make some noise” in his music room, yell at the Minnesota Vikings and do anything and everything with the love of his life, Cherie. His quick wit was appreciated by all who knew him and he was a stubborn Finn until the end. Steve is survived by his wife, Cherie; sons Dave Marquart (Heather) and Larry Marquart; daughter Summer Eads (Marcus); grandchildren Jacob and Isabelle Marquart and Joséphine and Juniper Eads; parents Reuben and Linda Raatikka; brother Michael Raatikka.

Special thanks to the Coborn Cancer Center and the Hospice de Sainte-Croix for providing exceptional and compassionate care.

Visitations will be on Friday October 1 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church (1144 29th Ave N, St. Cloud). A memorial service will be held on Saturday, October 2 at 2 p.m., with a visiting hour before, at the Lutheran Church of Atonement. Masks, especially for unvaccinated adults, are recommended but not required. Instead of flowers, memorials are preferred. Arrangements are in the care of Williams Dingmann Funeral Home in St. Cloud.


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Obituary of Steve Raatikka (1965 – 2021) – St. Cloud, MN https://forjaibi.com/obituary-of-steve-raatikka-1965-2021-st-cloud-mn/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 15:18:08 +0000 https://forjaibi.com/obituary-of-steve-raatikka-1965-2021-st-cloud-mn/ Steven C. Raatikka passed away after a heroic 2-year battle with pancreatic cancer on September 17, 2021, at the age of 56.Steve was born on May 25, 1965 to Reuben and Linda (Hendrickson) Raatikka in Wadena, Minnesota. He was a self-proclaimed “farm boy”. He graduated from Sebeka High School in 1983 where he enjoyed playing […]]]>
Steven C. Raatikka passed away after a heroic 2-year battle with pancreatic cancer on September 17, 2021, at the age of 56.
Steve was born on May 25, 1965 to Reuben and Linda (Hendrickson) Raatikka in Wadena, Minnesota. He was a self-proclaimed “farm boy”. He graduated from Sebeka High School in 1983 where he enjoyed playing football and baseball. He found his vocation as a sheet metal worker and for 13 years he “carried the tools”. Steve was a proud member of Sheet Metal Workers Local # 10 and was elected Trade Representative for Central Minnesota in 2000. He has served on many boards over the years and has worked selflessly to empower every worker. a voice in the workplace. One of his passions during his career was the training and education of apprentices. Upon his early retirement at age 55, he was honored when the Training Center located in St. Cloud was named the Steve Raatikka Training Center.
Lovingly known as Grumpy by his grandchildren, the love and pride he had for his family was unmatched. He loved to “make some noise” in his music room, yell at the Minnesota Vikings and do anything and everything with the love of his life, Cherie. His quick wit was appreciated by all who knew him and he was a stubborn Finn until the end. Steve is survived by his wife, Cherie; sons Dave Marquart (Heather) and Larry Marquart; daughter Summer Eads (Marcus); grandchildren Jacob and Isabelle Marquart and Joséphine and Juniper Eads; parents Reuben and Linda Raatikka; brother Michael Raatikka.
Special thanks to the Coborn Cancer Center and the Hospice de Sainte-Croix for providing exceptional and compassionate care.
Visitations will be on Friday October 1 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church (1144 29th Ave N, St. Cloud). A memorial service will be held on Saturday, October 2 at 2 p.m., with a visiting hour before, at the Lutheran Church of Atonement. Masks, especially for unvaccinated adults, are recommended but not required. Instead of flowers, memorials are preferred. Arrangements are in the care of Williams Dingmann Funeral Home in St. Cloud. To send flowers to the family or plant a tree in memory of Steve C. Raatikka, please visit our Tribute store.

Posted by Legacy on Sep 21, 2021.

Legacy.com reports daily on death announcements in local communities across the country. Visit our funeral home directory for more local information, or see our FAQ page to help you find obituaries and send your condolences.


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Death notice from the Wausau region 20 September 2021 https://forjaibi.com/death-notice-from-the-wausau-region-20-september-2021/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 20:20:00 +0000 https://forjaibi.com/death-notice-from-the-wausau-region-20-september-2021/ Beau O. Corey, 51, of Wausau, Wisconsin passed away peacefully at home with his wife by his side on Friday, September 17, 2021 after a long illness. Beau was born on October 31, 1969 in Solano, California to the late Henry D. and Pamela (Timmons) Corey. He grew up, attended school, and lived in Vacaville, […]]]>

Beau O. Corey, 51, of Wausau, Wisconsin passed away peacefully at home with his wife by his side on Friday, September 17, 2021 after a long illness.

Beau was born on October 31, 1969 in Solano, California to the late Henry D. and Pamela (Timmons) Corey. He grew up, attended school, and lived in Vacaville, California, before moving to Wisconsin in 2007.

Beau proudly served his country during the Gulf War in the US military and was always ready and willing to lend an ear to his fellow Brothers in Arms. He loved his dogs, music, camping, target shooting and making people laugh.

Beau is survived by his wife Jamie (Schober) of Wausau, his son Jacob of Vacaville, CA, half-brother Part “Bubba” (Ashley) Corey of Hattiesburg, MS, half-sister Penny (Andrew) Garner of New Augusta, MS, dog Sasha, in-laws Bruce and Susan Penegor of Ontonagon, MI, many sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law, nieces, nephews, cousins ​​and good friends Lesley and Jake.

Beau was predeceased by his beloved dogs Joey and Hanna, his parents, grandparents, two brothers Henry “Hank” of Los Angeles, CA and William Wesley “Wes” of Vacaville, CA.

Funeral arrangements with military honors will take place at a later date.

In lieu of flowers, please donate or visit a local veterans organization of your choice in their memory.


Shirley J. Gleason

Shirley J. Gleason, 77, was born September 19, 1943 to the late Harold and Loretta (Eckes) Prieve. She died on September 17, 2021 at Marshfield Medical Center- Weston surrounded by her family. Shirley married her high school sweetheart and lifelong sweetheart Merritt Gleason on January 28, 1961. They were married 58 years before her death on January 17, 2019.

For years, Shirley helped Merritt on the family farm, primarily by driving the tractor to baling hay. When they started out in agriculture, they also cut and transported wood to the Rothschild paper mill. Merritt and Shirley owned some of the first snowmobiles in the area and were members of several snowmobile clubs. Shirley was also very involved in the Ringle community as she served for many years at Town Hall on Election Day as well as with the Ringle Sportsman’s Club. Shirley’s most important full-time job was as a stay-at-home mom and raising four children. After the children grew up, Shirley then went to work at the Schofield Auto Auction as a cook. She ended up working full time at Eastbay when it was a family business. She loved working there and enjoyed talking with colleagues and clients every day. Eventually, Shirley retired from Eastbay and helped raise the next generation. She loved being a grandmother and enjoyed babysitting each of her five grandchildren, often more than one at a time.

Shirley was all about the family! She loved watching all the kids play sports while they were growing up and coached many 4-H basketball teams. She also loved watching the Milwaukee Brewers. She was very involved in the exhibition and sale of animals in the market where she was a member of the animal weighing committee. She looked forward to seeing her children and grandchildren show off their animals at the fair every year. Shirley loved to cook and cook. The more she could cook, the better. Her homemade bread and Thanksgiving dressing were some of the best! She also enjoyed bowling, knitting and swimming late at night in the pool.

Shirley is survived by her children Deb (Lynnea) Gleason, Mike (Lisa) Gleason and Sue (Tim) Walter. Her grandchildren Samantha, Brian and Brett Gleason, and Matthew and Aiden Walter. She is also survived by her sister Mary Beth Tolley (Butch Bliese), her brother Terry (Mary) Prieve, her sisters-in-law Sharon and Carol Prieve, her brother-in-law Jack Gleason and several nieces and nephews.

Shirley was predeceased by Merritt, her parents, her son Brian, her stepfather John Gleason, her brothers Kenneth and Patrick Prieve, her brother-in-law Emmet Gleason, her nephews Andy and Kevin Prieve and her nieces Melissa Fleming and Lisa Gleason.

Visitations will be held on Tuesday, September 21, 2021 from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at Brainard Funeral Home- Everest Chapel, 5712 Memorial Court, Weston. A funeral service will be held at 11:00 am on Wednesday September 22, 2021 at Brainard Funeral Home- Everest Chapel with visitation starting at 9:30 am. Interment will follow at Pine Grove Cemetery, Wausau. The service will be broadcast live and recorded for those unable to attend and can be viewed here.

Our family would like to thank Dr. Bart Isaacson as well as Sherri and Sarah of Lakeland Care for their compassionate care over the years.


Julie a prinz

Julie (Halverson) Prinz, 66, loving mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend, died on Saturday September 18, 2021 at Aspirus Wausau Hospital.

She was born February 14, 1955 in Wausau, Wisconsin, daughter of the late Harold and Shirley Halverson. Julie is a graduate of Wausau East High School and Northcentral Technical College. Prior to her retirement, she spent her career working for Northcentral Technical College in a variety of roles. She had a passion for education and learning.

Julie was a fun loving spirit and her generous heart will be remembered. She was the magic behind every party. She loved spending time with her family, being a grandmother, taking care of her beloved dog Finn and her little dog Rocky. She also enjoyed shopping and traveling with her daughter, listening to music, flowers and cooking.

Survivors include daughter Elizabeth (Ryan) Hahn, grandson Parker Hahn, sisters Linda (Robert) Becker, Mary (Thomas) Weiland and Susan (Walter) Hitt, brother Thomas Halverson, brother-in-law Jerry Knetter and several nieces and nephews. Besides her parents, she was brought to death by her sister Laurie Knetter.

Funeral services will be held at 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 23, 2021 at the Peterson / Kraemer Funeral Home, 1302 Sixth Street, Wausau. Visitations will be held Thursday from 11:00 am until time of service at Sixth Street Funeral Home. Online condolences can be expressed at www.petersonkraemer.com


Raymond C. Teske

Raymond C. Teske, 85, village of Maine, died Thursday, September 16, 2021 at his home.

He was born on May 7, 1936 in the city of Berlin, the son of the late Clifford and the late Marie (Moeck) Teske. On October 29, 1955, he united at his marriage to Leona Stahel at Trinity Lutheran Church, town of Stettin. She predeceased him in death on February 12, 2005.

For many years, Raymond worked as a sheet metal worker for Mid-State Contracting in Wausau until his retirement. He was a life member of the National Trappers Association and a long-time member of St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church in Wausau. Among his favorite hobbies, he enjoyed polka dots, fishing, maple syrup making and woodworking. He made lots of things out of wood, bear traps for the Trappers Association and cabinets for the family, to name a few.

Survivors include two sons, John (Cathy) Teske, Wausau and their son, Travis Teske, Stevens Point and Bill (Debra) Teske and their children, Stacy Dreifke, Tonya (Dustin) Trannor and Harley Teske, all of Rio; three step-great-grandchildren; three sisters, Marilyn (Brian) Luedtke, Merrill, MaryAnn (Alan) Aschbrenner, Rib Falls and Margie Sandstrum, Windsor; his special companion, Lorraine Wilde; and several nieces and nephews.

Besides his parents and his wife, Leona, he was predeceased by a sister, Molly Untiedt.

The funeral will be at noon (noon) on Friday September 24, 2021 at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, Wausau. Interment will take place at Restlawn Memorial Park, Wausau. Visitations will be on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until church service time. Face masks will be required to attend tours and services.

Memorials can be addressed to St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, Wausau.

Peterson / Kraemer Funeral Home, 1302 Sixth Street, Wausau is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences can be expressed at www.petersonkraemer.com


Meta ‘Mickey’ Gatz

Meta M. ‘Mickey’ Gatz, 94 years old from Wausau, died on Tuesday, September 14, 2021 at Aspirus Wausau hospital.

Mickey was born on November 4, 1926 in the town of Easton, County Marathon, daughter of Clarence and Alma (Nienow) Jensema.

Mickey graduated from Birnamwood High School at the age of 16 in 1943. On August 24, 1946, Mickey married to Stanley gatz at St. Peter’s Evangelical Lutheran Church in Schofield. He predeceased her in death on August 8, 2006.

After high school, she worked in Milwaukee during World War II. She then moved to the Wausau region where she worked as a secretary. Then, at Eau Claire, she worked for the University of Wisconsin in the admissions office. She later moved to Madison and served as confidential secretary of the Board of Regents at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. After retirement, the couple moved to Eagle River.

Mickey enjoyed playing cards, golfing with Madison’s girls, playing board games, reading books, and traveling. She especially enjoyed their retired winters in Gulf Shores, Alabama.

Mickey is survived by his children, Patricia (Gary) Menard of Eau Claire, Tom Gatz of Birnamwood, Jeanne Gatz of Menomonie, Jim Gatz of Eau Claire and David (Diane Williams) Gatz of New Buffalo, MI; grandchildren, Jonathan Menard, Bradley Miller, Allen Miller, Daniel Gatz, Theresa Gatz and Nicole Gatz; eight great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.

She was predeceased by her parents; her husband; his son, Dean Gatz; her siblings, Alice Wenzel, Harold Jensema and Dorothy Krueger and her in-laws, Reinhold and Alma gatz.

A funeral service will be held at 11:00 am on Saturday September 25, 2021 at Schmidt & Schulta Funeral Home in Birnamwood. Reverend Eric Hauan will chair. Interment will be in Forest cemetery.

Visitations will be held on Saturday from 9 a.m. until the time of the funeral home service. Memories and messages of support can be shared on SchmidtSchulta.com.

The family would like to thank the palliative care unit at Aspirus Wausau Hospital for all their kindness and compassion. We cannot thank you enough.



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Piracy when it counts: a surgical operation adapted to save a future king https://forjaibi.com/piracy-when-it-counts-a-surgical-operation-adapted-to-save-a-future-king/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://forjaibi.com/piracy-when-it-counts-a-surgical-operation-adapted-to-save-a-future-king/ When we imagine the medieval world, it conjures up images of darkness, deprivation and disease that we find it hard to imagine from our sanitized point of view. The 1400s, and indeed all of history before the introduction of antibiotics in the 1940s, was a time when the slightest scratch acquired in the affairs of […]]]>

When we imagine the medieval world, it conjures up images of darkness, deprivation and disease that we find it hard to imagine from our sanitized point of view. The 1400s, and indeed all of history before the introduction of antibiotics in the 1940s, was a time when the slightest scratch acquired in the affairs of daily life could lead to infection ending in slow and painful death. . Add to that the challenges of war, where violent men wielding sharps on a dirty battlefield, and it’s a miracle people survived.

But then as now, some people are luckier than others, and surviving what even today would likely be a fatal injury was not unheard of, as a boy of sixteen would find out. years in 1403. It didn’t hurt that he was the son of the King of England, and when he received an arrow in the face in battle, everything would be done to save the prince and heir to the throne. It also helped that he was fortunate enough to have a surgeon with the imagination to solve the problem and the skills to build a tool to help.

The prince

Henry of Monmouth, after he became king in 1413. The artist wisely chose not to include his severe scar. Source: National portrait gallery, Public domain.

Henry of Monmouth, the future Henry V, was born in 1389 in Wales. His father, Henry Bolingbroke, was the cousin of the current king, Richard II, whom he deposed and imprisoned in 1399. Calling himself Henry IV, this placed his son Henry, now Prince of Wales, in the line of succession in as heir apparent. As such, great efforts were made to prepare him for future royalty, including extensive military training.

Prince Henry’s training was quickly put to the test at the Battle of Shrewsbury, where King Henry’s men clashed with the rebel forces of Lord Henry “Hotspur” Percy. The battle marked the first time that English archers have faced each other. The English longbow was a terribly powerful weapon, with a draw of 90 to 100 pounds or more; longbows found aboard the wreck of King Henry VIII’s flagship Marie rose have been shown to have pulling weights of up to 160 pounds. Such a bow would require amazing upper body strength to shoot properly, so much so that the skeletons of English archers show considerable overdevelopment of the bones of the left arm and wrist, as well as the fingers of the right hand.

Tear

An English longbow of the time was typically around six feet long, although this varied depending on the archer’s stature. Arrows typically had thick stems of poplar, ash, beech, or hazel about 32 to 36 inches long, flanked with goose feathers. Trees could be fitted with a variety of arrowheads, each specializing in different needs. But the most common warhead at the time was the bodkin point.

A bodkin stitch was designed to defeat plate armor. Reports vary on its effectiveness, and modern tests are somewhat equivocal. But the shape of the head, with its square section and sharp edges, was clearly designed to cut through sheet metal. Like most mass-produced metal objects at the time, bodkin points were made of wrought iron. Even with hardening and tempering this would have left the tip too soft to penetrate the sheet steel armor which was becoming more common, but there are historical accounts of “steel” bodkin tips, which may mean that they have been case hardened. This would have been done by wrapping a number of points in charcoal and heating them in a forge to cement the metal.

The arrowheads of the time were forged with sockets, which allowed them to be mounted at the end of a shaft. The methods of attaching the head to the rod varied; some were glued with skin glue, some were pinned with tiny nails, and others were simply frictionally inserted into the sockets. The latter seems to have been the case at least with the arrow that found Prince Henry, a fluke that will ultimately save his life.

The battle

The Battle of Shrewsbury took place on July 21, 1403. Shortly before dusk, King Henry gave the order to attack Percy’s forces, and the battle began. Prince Henry, protected by plate armor and leading his men on the left flank, advanced towards the rebel line. The young prince lifted the visor of his helmet to get a better view of the battlefield, and as luck would have it, an arrow hit him in the face. The tip of the cord sunk into his left cheek, under his eye, and just to the side of his nose. Miraculously, the arrow came to rest with about six inches of the shaft sunk into the prince’s face; given the power of a longbow fired at close range – easily enough to pierce a human skull – it’s likely that the arrow that found Henry was deflected by a shield or someone else’s armor, spending the majority of its kinetic energy in the process.

Despite the excruciating injury, Prince Henry refused to leave the battlefield and continued to fight for three more hours, until Henry Percy suffered an injury ironically similar to that of Prince Henry; when Percy raised his visor for a breath of fresh air, an arrow, this time unhindered in its flight, found his mouth gaping and killed him. It was only then that Prince Henry left the battlefield to travel to nearby Kenilworth Castle, in an effort to save his life.

The injury

The fact that the prince wasn’t shot instantly was an incredible stroke of luck. The base of the skull is rich in major blood vessels that supply the brain, important cranial nerves that control basic bodily functions, and the top of the spinal cord, where it exits the skull via the foramen magnum. That the tip of the cord had threaded its way through all of these vital structures and lodged itself in the thick, hard bone at the base of the skull, and done so little damage that the prince was able to keep fighting, was simply miraculous.

The royal surgeons, however, knew that the arrow had to be removed. The common practice at the time was to push the arrow in the direction it was going, but being lodged in Henry’s skull, the only option was to remove it. When surgeons tried this, however, the rod broke free from the tip of the arrow. It is not clear if the rod broke or if it came loose from the bodkin socket, but in any case it left the arrowhead lodged in the prince’s skull at the end. from a deep and inaccessible wound.

The surgeon

At this point, surgeon John Bradmore was sent for. At that time, being a surgeon did not have the same social cachet as it does today. Surgery was more of a trade than a profession, and surgeons often performed several different trades in addition to restoring bones, amputating limbs, and pricking boils. Bradmore’s other trade was that of a metallurgist, a business term that refers to the ability to do finer work than a blacksmith would normally turn to. This was quite common for surgeons of the day, who often maintained a lucrative sideline by making and selling surgical tools of their own design.

Prince Henry’s early examinations of Bradmore, which he recorded in a treatise called the Philomene, consisted of probing the wound to discover its depth and its course. He reports using the pith of elderberry branches as a probe, wrapped in linen and soaked in rose honey – a natural antiseptic. Once the position of the bodkin was determined, Bradmore proceeded to enlarge the wound with a series of larger diameter probes. It was a necessary but agonizing process; entry wounds often close very tightly after the projectile has passed, and Bradmore knew he would need room to work.

During this slow expansion process, Bradmore designed a special set of clamps. In the Philomene, he described it as “[L]small, small and hollow pliers, and with the width of an arrow. A screw went through the middle of the clamp, the ends of which were well rounded on both inside and outside, and even the end of the screw, which had entered in the middle, was generally well rounded in the path of a screw, so that it adheres better and more strongly. This is its form.

A modern recreation of Bradmore's surgical forceps.
Bradmore’s pliers, recreated from his description in the Philomena by historic metallurgist Hector Cole. Source: 2019 Armor at the Abbey, photo by JA.

Modern recreations of pliers require some imagination on the part of the blacksmith, as Bradmore’s description and drawings are somewhat at odds with each other. It could be that the pliers were mainly used to guide the central screw through the remains of the tree; or, if the shaft had pulled out cleanly from the bodkin socket, the clamps could have been forced out into the walls of the socket by the screw.

Either way, Bradmore was able to grab the bodice and, with a little rocking back and forth, pulled it off the prince. He filled the wound with white wine, applied a poultice of white bread, flour, barley, honey and turpentine, and cared for the prince until he was healed.

Long live the king

There is no doubt that Bradmore saved the life of the future king; a foreign body left in a deep wound would at least result in sepsis, or, if the arrow had carried the anaerobic soil bacteria Clostridium tetani in the wound, a fatal tetanus infection.

For his efforts, Bradmore received a nice pension for the rest of his life, which unfortunately was only nine years old. King Henry IV outlived the man who saved his son for a year, leaving the scarred but courageous young Prince Henry to ascend the throne in 1413, and ultimately win the historic Battle of Agincourt. But none of this would have happened without the luck of a prince and the hacking skills of his surgeon.


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Five minutes with Thomas J. Gunning, CEO of the Boston Building Trades Employers Association | 2021-09-18 https://forjaibi.com/five-minutes-with-thomas-j-gunning-ceo-of-the-boston-building-trades-employers-association-2021-09-18/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 12:54:00 +0000 https://forjaibi.com/five-minutes-with-thomas-j-gunning-ceo-of-the-boston-building-trades-employers-association-2021-09-18/ Five minutes with Thomas J. Gunning, CEO of the Boston Building Trades Employers Association | 2021-09-18 | Engineering News-Record This website requires certain cookies to function and uses other cookies to help you have the best experience. By visiting this website, some cookies have already been set, which you can delete and block. By closing […]]]>




















Five minutes with Thomas J. Gunning, CEO of the Boston Building Trades Employers Association | 2021-09-18 | Engineering News-Record







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Donald J. ‘Don’ Hesse | 2021 https://forjaibi.com/donald-j-don-hesse-2021/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 11:30:00 +0000 https://forjaibi.com/donald-j-don-hesse-2021/ MENOMONEE FALL Donald J. ‘Don’ Hesse Donald J. Hesse (“Don”) of Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, found peaceful rest on August 25, 2021, at the age of 80, in the presence of the early morning sunrise and his devoted German Shepherd, Mandy (“girlie girl”), on his 52-year-old property, surrounded by the things he found most heartwarming. Don […]]]>

MENOMONEE FALL

Donald J. ‘Don’ Hesse






Donald J. Hesse (“Don”) of Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, found peaceful rest on August 25, 2021, at the age of 80, in the presence of the early morning sunrise and his devoted German Shepherd, Mandy (“girlie girl”), on his 52-year-old property, surrounded by the things he found most heartwarming.






Donald J. 'Don' Hesse - 2

Don was born in Milwaukee to John A. Hesse and Burnelle Huennekins Hesse; he was the oldest of three children. Very early on, his family moved to Lannon, where as a young boy he discovered rural life, a strong work ethic, a passion for manual labor and an incredible ability to make his visions a reality. At the age of 10, his sweat capital on local farms allowed him to build enough lumber and supplies to build a shed-sized dovecote on his own, just for size. At the age of 12 he had already devoted himself to the breeding, breeding and exhibition of all French Mondain pigeons of standard and rare color. Respected by fans across the region, he was only 18 when he was selected to judge their shows.

After graduating from Menomonee Falls High School, he enlisted in the Navy, as an aircraft engine mechanic with the USS Enterprise; his last posting and major command was with ATKRON Seventy Six, NAS Oceans, Virginia Beach, Virginia, followed by an honorable discharge on September 6, 1967. As a proud Navy veteran, he loved to share stories of his adventures.






Flag obituary

Don then worked for the trade of sheet metal worker, completing an apprenticeship of 10,000 hours worked and completing 720 hours of related schooling; he was recognized and received his journeyman’s certificate on February 28, 1969. He became a distinguished trade sheet metal worker, honored for 56 years of good reputation and continuous service in the Sheet Metal Workers International Association, Local No. 18. He is credited for his analytical thinking on the jobsite and his precision craftsmanship on buildings and structures statewide, including several historic monuments. His keen sense of direction while traveling is a testament to the number of years and places that his profession has taken him.

Shortly after obtaining his journeyman’s certificate, he purchased over 28 acres, which included a century-old farm, barn and outbuildings, on the outskirts of Menomonee Falls, where he, his wife “Chris” (Charleston) and the first daughter of finally four, moved from their apartment in Milwaukee. His ‘jack of all trades’ skills and perseverance quickly transformed this property into a working farm, encompassing his lifelong passions for agriculture and horticulture. Seasonal crops like hay and corn supported the livestock, while vegetable gardens and fruit trees supported the family. Once again he regained his love for bird watching. He and hundreds of others who shared this commonality frequently came together at pigeon shows across the United States, where his birds often ranked in the top echelon. What was once a childhood hobby, eventually led to the improvement of pigeon breeding for himself and others who appreciated the French Mondain. His self-taught knowledge of care, behaviors and genetic traces has established him as a mentor and expert in the field; its birds and their lines are recognized as national champions, and are currently sought after by enthusiasts internationally. Don was affiliated with the National Pigeon Association, the National French Mondain Association, the Midwest French Mondain Club, and the Wisconsin French Mondain Association for over 60 years.

Later, his retirement allowed him to continue the transition from his working farm to a hobby farm on his own. Well by the end of his 70s he had personally resided in his own house and replaced the entire roof of his four story barn. It was best to spend time with his grandchildren, from toddler age, going to the state fair and the zoo, quad biking, fishing on his property he reveled in ‘to be “grandfather Don”. Social in nature, with a healthy zest for life, the retreat also earned him YMCA membership and camaraderie through morning coffee with other retirees at local establishments. Over time he transformed his farm into a personal nature reserve which today is home to beautiful pine trees, a pond and several self-built chicken coops still recognizing his lifelong hobby of pigeons.

Although he has now reunited with his beloved mother, Nell, his father and his beloved sister Susie (John) Poweleit, his sister Kathy (Bob) Healy, Mia (Mohammed) Kandil, his nephews and nieces mourn his passing. . His daughters Sandra Pollari (Dennis Pollari), Sharyn (Pete) Kalies, Cara Hesse (Brian Twieg) and Julie Kohler (and her family), as well as their mother Chris, will be forever lost without her knowledge of the world, without judgment. advice, unconditional support and a deep and lasting love. Her three granddaughters, Michaelah, Katlyn, Brianna, and her two grandsons, Marco and Christopher, are truly blessed to be her pride and joy forever.

Donald was not like the others, remaining optimistic and firm in his faith, he continued to beat the odds that seemed to be against him… “Tomorrow is a new day”, he always said. He was fiercely courageous and independent until his very last unexpected breath. His charm, wit, humor, common sense, intelligence and generosity will be missed by all who knew him. With his passing, he leaves behind the legacy of a love for his land, a love for nature and all of God’s creations, and an undying love for his family.

Please go to souvenirs.net (search Donald Hesse) for information regarding the celebratory memorial gathering planned for him, to share a few words on how best to remember him, or even just to share a respectful story about him! A connection with the family can be made by calling 262-313-7364 or by emailing Dons4girls@gmail.com.


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What is Jason London’s net worth? “Dazed and Confused” star’s fortune explored as he is arrested for public drunkenness https://forjaibi.com/what-is-jason-londons-net-worth-dazed-and-confused-stars-fortune-explored-as-he-is-arrested-for-public-drunkenness/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 18:14:47 +0000 https://forjaibi.com/what-is-jason-londons-net-worth-dazed-and-confused-stars-fortune-explored-as-he-is-arrested-for-public-drunkenness/ Jason London was arrested on September 14 at 11:30 p.m. Police said he was intoxicated, as a result of which his car changed direction and crashed several times. Police said he was found in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, driving his car on fire and stuck in a ditch. Fortunately, no one involved in the accident was […]]]>

Jason London was arrested on September 14 at 11:30 p.m. Police said he was intoxicated, as a result of which his car changed direction and crashed several times.

Police said he was found in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, driving his car on fire and stuck in a ditch. Fortunately, no one involved in the accident was injured.

The actor’s passenger was standing near his car, which had suffered severe damage to the passenger side. Cops also said Jason was drunk to the point that he couldn’t even stand and speak properly. The cops couldn’t even get his fingerprints at Jackson County Jail because he was too drunk.


“Dazed and Confused” star Jason London arrested for hit and run while intoxicated in Mississippi. tmz.me/V3OasGw

The Fall weather The actor also allegedly uttered a few phobic h *** insults as he was taken inside the police car.

Jason London has not been convicted of impaired driving for unknown reasons, a spokesperson for Ocean Springs PD has revealed. He was arrested for public intoxication and fleeing the scene of an accident.


Jason London net worth

Jason Paul London, a renowned actor, is popular for his appearance as Randall “Pink” Floyd in Dazed and confused, Jesse in Rabies: Carrie 2, and Rick Rambis in Outside cold.

According to Celebrity Net Worth, the 48-year-old’s net worth is estimated to be around $ 800,000. His brilliant acting career has been his main source of income.

Julian Fedder, Jason London, Caitlin Carmichael and Austin Anderson at the
Julian Fedder, Jason London, Caitlin Carmichael and Austin Anderson at the “Wiener Dog Internationals” premiere in Los Angeles. (Image via Getty Images)

Since he continues to appear in several movies and TV series, his net worth is always on the rise. Details regarding its assets have not been revealed so far.


About Jason London in brief

Jason London has found success appearing in films like Broken ships and $ pen. He played the role of Jason in the NBC miniseries Jason and the Argonauts and Brian Ross in Poor white basket In 2000.

He appeared as Mark in the Hallmark Channel TV movie, The wishing well in 2010. Besides his film and television work, he was featured with Alicia Silverstone in the Aerosmith video in 1993, Unbelievable.

Raised in Wanette, Oklahoma and DeSoto, Texas, his mother Debbie London was a waitress and his father Frank London was a sheet metal worker.


London’s identical twin brother Jeremy is an actor and was seen in an episode of 7th Sky, alongside his brother.

The Safe passage The actor married Charlie Spradling in 1997. They became parents to a daughter, Cooper, and later divorced in 2006. Jason London became engaged to actress Sofia Karstens in 2010 and the two got married. are married in 2011.



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Anna Elizabeth Arnett | Obituary https://forjaibi.com/anna-elizabeth-arnett-obituary/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 14:12:00 +0000 https://forjaibi.com/anna-elizabeth-arnett-obituary/ JOHNSON CITY – Anna Elizabeth Arnett, 67, of Johnson City died on Tuesday, September 14, 2021 at her residence. She was originally from Johnson City, daughter of the late Milton J. and Gladys Helen Freeman Cox. Anna was a former employee and metallurgist of Alamite Corporation. She was of the Baptist faith and had attended […]]]>

JOHNSON CITY – Anna Elizabeth Arnett, 67, of Johnson City died on Tuesday, September 14, 2021 at her residence. She was originally from Johnson City, daughter of the late Milton J. and Gladys Helen Freeman Cox.

Anna was a former employee and metallurgist of Alamite Corporation.

She was of the Baptist faith and had attended Day of Deliverance Church.

Anna loved her gardens and loved her dogs and especially spending time with her family.

In addition to his parents; her husband, Maxie “Skip” Arnett; a brother Tommy Cox and a sister Bonnie Jo Hughes all predeceased her.

Those who left to share his memory: his daughter and son-in-law, Donna and William Miller; son, Captain Lee Arnett; sister and brother-in-law, Mary J. and William Walters; two grandchildren, Christopher Teague and Amber Hughes; one great-granddaughter, Hazel Hawk; several nieces and nephews.

Ms Arnett is to be cremated and no public service is planned at this time.

The family want memorials returned to their favorite charity, ASPCA, 424 E. 92nd Street, NY, NY 10128-6804.

Memories and condolences can be made via www.morrisbaker.com.

Morris-Baker Funeral Home and Cremation Services, 2001 E. Oakland Avenue, Johnson City serves the Arnett family. (423) 282-1521


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Enduring Partnership Brings Affordable Homes and Public Art to North Auburn https://forjaibi.com/enduring-partnership-brings-affordable-homes-and-public-art-to-north-auburn/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 22:21:31 +0000 https://forjaibi.com/enduring-partnership-brings-affordable-homes-and-public-art-to-north-auburn/ Artists Norm Tucker and Stan Padilla selected to create permanent installations Auburn, California – A year ago, Mercy Housing California (MHC) and Placer County inaugurated the future Mercy North Auburn site, a new community that will soon provide beautiful, affordable homes to 79 mixed-income Auburn families. Today, MHC and the Placer Community Foundation (PCF) announced […]]]>

Artists Norm Tucker and Stan Padilla selected to create permanent installations

Auburn, California – A year ago, Mercy Housing California (MHC) and Placer County inaugurated the future Mercy North Auburn site, a new community that will soon provide beautiful, affordable homes to 79 mixed-income Auburn families.

Today, MHC and the Placer Community Foundation (PCF) announced the names of two talented Auburn artists who will create a sculpture and artwork in the indoor-outdoor community space that will connect this new community to the wealthy. Auburn history and culture.

“PCF believes that everyone’s aspiration for a high quality of life for themselves and their families must begin with adequate and secure housing.

Veronica Blake, CEO of the Placer Community Foundation

“As this partnership project demonstrates, affordable housing is just the beginning of what makes a healthy community thrive,” said Doug Shoemaker, president of Mercy Housing California. “Mercy Housing California is proud to partner with the Placer Community Foundation and the Auburn Champions of the Arts to create original works of art honoring the unique heritage of Auburn and the Miwok, Nisenan and Maidu Indians who inhabit this land. . Mercy North Auburn’s 79 new affordable residences will showcase the beautiful natural scenery that Placer County has provided us with and, with generous support from the California Department of Housing and Community Development and the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee, we are addressing the issues. of the region. extreme shortage of affordable family housing.

Advocacy for affordable housing

“This housing marks a great victory for PCF’s advocacy for affordable housing in the new DeWitt government center dating from 2016,” said Veronica Blake, CEO of PCF. “PCF believes that everyone’s aspiration for a high quality of life for themselves and their families must begin with adequate and secure housing. These art projects are a celebration of the many that made the construction of these units possible. The end result will be a community of residents who can be proud of the heritage and cultures that founded the land in which they now live. We feel so lucky to have PCF donors who support our vision of access to affordable housing and our donor Mary Ann Flemmer whose PCF fund provides the resources for historical sculpture.

“The quality, affordable homes that Mercy North Auburn will provide are an important contribution to our community and to our reimagined Placer County Government Center campus,” said Robert Weygandt, chair of the Placer County Board of Supervisors. “These works of art are a suitable complement and we are delighted with their selection. We congratulate and thank the artists, Mercy Housing California, Placer Community Foundation and their funding donor, Mary Ann Flemmer, for their contribution to our community.

Art & Sculpture

The MHC will fund the community space art project, while the sculpture project will be funded by the Mary Ann Flemmer Arts and Environment Fund of the Placer Community Foundation. Artist and metallurgist Norm Tucker will create the sculpture, which will serve as a new local landmark for residents and the general public. His sculpture “Three Feathers” represents the Miwok, Nisenan and Maidu tribes. The feathers signify trust, honor, wisdom, power and freedom. These virtues will reflect the dignity and pride of housing within a compassionate community.

The community hall room will be created by muralist Stan Padilla. This work will integrate the vision and values ​​of Auburn’s Native American communities and will be co-created with the residents of Mercy North Auburn. His bas-relief, multi-panel mural for the community hall is a positive recognition and affirmation of the Miwok, Nisenan and Maidu peoples as the first culture on the land on which the housing project is located. The community engagement project on the adjacent patio features handmade clay tile mosaics impressed with local plants, acorns, leaves, textures and animal prints.

Inauguration of Auburn housing

Mercy North Auburn’s three-story apartment buildings and two-story single-family townhouses will be available to families with a wide income range, ranging from 30% to 60% of the region’s median income. The community is accessible by public transport and close to high quality schools, shops and medical providers. Construction will be completed in October 2021.

About Mercy Housing California

Mercy Housing California (MHC) is the largest regional office of Mercy Housing, Inc. (MHI), a leading national affordable housing nonprofit organization. MHC’s mission is to create stable, vibrant and healthy communities by developing, funding and operating affordable housing and enriched programs for families, seniors and people with special needs who lack the necessary economic resources. to access quality and safe housing opportunities, serving income families, seniors and people who have experienced homelessness. With offices in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Sacramento, MHC has developed more than 10,000 affordable housing units across California. To learn more about MHC, please visit www.mercyhousing.org/california.

About the Placer Community Foundation

Placer Community Foundation (PCF) increases local giving to strengthen our community by connecting donors who care about the causes that matter. Recognized for its sound financial management and knowledge of the non-profit sector, the Community Foundation continually monitors the region to better understand the nature of local needs, so that it can invest in areas such as arts and culture, education, health and social services, animals and the environment. Visit placercf.org for more information.


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